Lord Over Karma

The Unborn Bhagavad Gita is a manual in being free from the negative effects of karma. The hyperlink indicated is a chapter in the series on the Yoga of Discernment. The Unborn Lord of Yoga (portrayed as Krishna) indicates to a disheartened Arjuna: 2.2 Why do you act cowardly, especially in this time of your great spiritual crisis? You are inflicting a grave injustice to those who uphold the Ariyan Spirit. What a shameful disgrace you are inflicting upon your-self; in this fashion you shall Read more [...]
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Kammanirodha

The emphasis on karma (kamma) in Early Buddhism was upon a series of factors that comprise the very angst of life: individualistic, sociological, and psychological components all constitute early doctrinal factors resulting in karmic-effect. Essentially, Kamma referred to what an individual inherits from oneself in some previous form of existence—not what one inherits from their ancestors. Hence, the Buddha and his sages declared that it was not so much [the action] itself, but rather the exclusive-intentional Read more [...]
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The Sacrifice is the Thing

Vedic Origins of the Karmic Doctrine and Rebirth Before becoming a doctrinal formulation in the early Upanisads, karma had its antecedent roots in ancient Vedic ritual constructions: The word Karman (from which the term Karma is derived) in the pre-Upanisadic literature means any religious act or rite (as sacrifice, oblation etc. especially as originating in the hope of future recompense and as opposed to any speculative religion or knowledge of spirit). The word Karman occurs about forty Read more [...]
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Karma and Rebirth

This January series will be a systematic study on Karma and Rebirth. We will consider the topic from many different perspectives, essentially broken down in the following schemata: Vedic Origins Early Buddhist Unborn Bhagavad Gita The Yogasūtras of Patañjali Mahayana and Yogacara Dependent Origination and the Tibetan View While the definition of Karma will be a comprehensive one, it is best at this junction to construct a working delineation: A volitional action (ontologically Read more [...]
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The well of no origin

Please share what you have, so I may quench this thirst. The well is over there. Why don´t you taste the water yourself? Where? I cannot see it. Something is obviously in the way obscuring the view. How do I remove it? It is not real. You cannot remove what is not real, the very act itself would be unreal and spiritually injurious. Like trying to fill a bottomless bucket with water. Why not bring yourself straight through it? Something brought this sack of bones and desperate ideas Read more [...]
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Highlights from the Mahāparinirvāṇasūtra

Reflecting back upon the introductory blog from this series, along with the analysis of the Self from contemporary scholars like Dr. Tony Page and Dr. Chris Jones, the other salient construct revolved around Shimoda Masahiro’s hypothesis that the early stupa-based communities discovered the “hidden Buddha Nature” best in context of a sutra-based formulation. This construct indicated that the primary catalyst for such a shift was sparked by the early dharmakathika, or (Dharma masters). At Read more [...]
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The Moon Parable

The Mahāparinirvāṇasūtra makes excellent use of parables in order to construct analogies as to the True Buddha Nature. The Moon Parable stands out in analogizing how the cycles of the Moon reflect the perennial nature of the Tathagata. Chapter 15: The Moon Parable (Charles Patton translation): The Buddha told Kasyapa, "It is just like when people see the moon not appear and say 'The moon has disappeared!' and think that it has disappeared. Yet, the moon's nature really has not disappeared. Read more [...]
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Entering the Garbha-Self

Number Twelve is the flagship chapter for the Mahāparinirvāṇasūtra; it further details the True Nature of the Self and then highlights its salvific context as, “After hearing this sutra one thereupon understands that all living beings possess Buddha-nature, and this is the reason why I expound the Mahāparinirvāṇasūtra.” Chapter 12: On the Nature of the Tathagata (Yamamoto-Page translation): Kasyapa said to the Buddha: "O World-Honoured One! Is there Self in the 25 existences Read more [...]
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Origin of the One who Suffers

Chapter Ten: On the Four Truths There’s an interesting copy of this chapter translated by Charles Patton found on the old Dark Zen website. The notable difference from other copies concerns the line, "That which is called [the sufferer] is not called the noble truth of suffering.” The translation otherwise found says “That which is called [suffering].” Whatever the reason was for the change, it fits in perfectly with the main thrust of the chapter as “the origin of the one who suffers”. Read more [...]
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Dharma of the Evil One

Chapter Nine: On Good and Evil (Mark L. Blum translation): As a carry-over from the last chapter, Kāśyapa inquires from the Blessed One as to whether or not one should continue to depend upon and find refuge in the āryapudgala during his absence. The Buddha responds in the affirmative, stating that they counteract the powers of the evil one: Over seven hundred years after my parinirvāṇa this Māra Pāpīyas will gradually bring about a collapse of my true-dharma. Like a hunter Read more [...]
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