Karmic Liberation: The Great Synthesis

Tibetan, or more specifically, Vajrayana Buddhism, offers the great synthesis of all that has transpired in this series: Ritual prayer to lighten the burden of the Bardo; Dhyana-techniques to bring the effects of karma to their completion; Divine Union with the karma-family and Amoghasiddhi; the Yoga of the Thatness; Dogzchen rigpa and Samantabhadra's matrix. The Tibetan people developed a unique road-map of the effects of Dependent Origination, The Wheel of Existence: In this depiction, Read more [...]
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Karma’s Repository

The advent of Mahāyāna Buddhism that coincided with the beginning of the Christian-era gave birth to the most sublime innovations in Buddhist-thought that have not been surpassed even to this day. Colorful, dynamic and transcendent in scope, resplendent with rich metaphorical language founded in the rich soil of sūtra and śāstra laden literature, the Mahāyāna shaped a new and indefatigable-direction for the nature of the karma-effect. According to the Sarvāstivādin and Theravādin doctrine, Read more [...]
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Karmāśaya

In conjunction with earlier blogs in this series, Patañjali's work does not beat around the bush—there needs to be a daily purification of the sattva, of one’s being. If not undertaken, future karmic seeds will continue to run amok. Mircea Eliade writes eloquently about being conditioned and governed by the seeds of karma: This means that every action whose point of departure is illusion (that is, which is based on ignorance, the confusion between Spirit and non-Spirit) is either the consummation Read more [...]
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Lord Over Karma

The Unborn Bhagavad Gita is a manual in being free from the negative effects of karma. The hyperlink indicated is a chapter in the series on the Yoga of Discernment. The Unborn Lord of Yoga (portrayed as Krishna) indicates to a disheartened Arjuna: 2.2 Why do you act cowardly, especially in this time of your great spiritual crisis? You are inflicting a grave injustice to those who uphold the Ariyan Spirit. What a shameful disgrace you are inflicting upon your-self; in this fashion you shall Read more [...]
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Kammanirodha

The emphasis on karma (kamma) in Early Buddhism was upon a series of factors that comprise the very angst of life: individualistic, sociological, and psychological components all constitute early doctrinal factors resulting in karmic-effect. Essentially, Kamma referred to what an individual inherits from oneself in some previous form of existence—not what one inherits from their ancestors. Hence, the Buddha and his sages declared that it was not so much [the action] itself, but rather the exclusive-intentional Read more [...]
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The Sacrifice is the Thing

Vedic Origins of the Karmic Doctrine and Rebirth Before becoming a doctrinal formulation in the early Upanisads, karma had its antecedent roots in ancient Vedic ritual constructions: The word Karman (from which the term Karma is derived) in the pre-Upanisadic literature means any religious act or rite (as sacrifice, oblation etc. especially as originating in the hope of future recompense and as opposed to any speculative religion or knowledge of spirit). The word Karman occurs about forty Read more [...]
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Karma and Rebirth

This January series will be a systematic study on Karma and Rebirth. We will consider the topic from many different perspectives, essentially broken down in the following schemata: Vedic Origins Early Buddhist Unborn Bhagavad Gita The Yogasūtras of Patañjali Mahayana and Yogacara Dependent Origination and the Tibetan View While the definition of Karma will be a comprehensive one, it is best at this junction to construct a working delineation: A volitional action (ontologically Read more [...]
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The well of no origin

Please share what you have, so I may quench this thirst. The well is over there. Why don´t you taste the water yourself? Where? I cannot see it. Something is obviously in the way obscuring the view. How do I remove it? It is not real. You cannot remove what is not real, the very act itself would be unreal and spiritually injurious. Like trying to fill a bottomless bucket with water. Why not bring yourself straight through it? Something brought this sack of bones and desperate ideas Read more [...]
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Highlights from the Mahāparinirvāṇasūtra

Reflecting back upon the introductory blog from this series, along with the analysis of the Self from contemporary scholars like Dr. Tony Page and Dr. Chris Jones, the other salient construct revolved around Shimoda Masahiro’s hypothesis that the early stupa-based communities discovered the “hidden Buddha Nature” best in context of a sutra-based formulation. This construct indicated that the primary catalyst for such a shift was sparked by the early dharmakathika, or (Dharma masters). At Read more [...]
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The Moon Parable

The Mahāparinirvāṇasūtra makes excellent use of parables in order to construct analogies as to the True Buddha Nature. The Moon Parable stands out in analogizing how the cycles of the Moon reflect the perennial nature of the Tathagata. Chapter 15: The Moon Parable (Charles Patton translation): The Buddha told Kasyapa, "It is just like when people see the moon not appear and say 'The moon has disappeared!' and think that it has disappeared. Yet, the moon's nature really has not disappeared. Read more [...]
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