Posts Tagged ‘Mahayana’

Nāgāhvaya

159-161. (Cleary]: With five fives plus five, and nine flaws, covered with nails, teeth, and hair, one is born, quivering. Like a maggot when newborn, the human being is as if awakened from sleep; form becomes visible by means of the eye, development proceeds from performance. With a combination of the palate, lips, and oral cavity, conceived by mental construction, human speech issues like that of a parrot, by false imagination. Further elucidations bespeaking the skandhic-bundle. The most Read more [...]

The Queen’s Mahayana

The Buddha told Srīmālā, “You should now explain further the embracing of the true Dharma, which l have taught, and which is cherished by all Buddhas alike."  Srīmālā said, “Very well. World-Honored One. The embracing of the true Dharma is called the Mahayana. Why? Because the Mahayana gives birth to all Sravakas and Pratyekabuddhas, and all mundane and supramundane wholesome dharmas. Just as Lake Anavatapta is the source of the eight rivers, so the Mahayana produces all all Sravakas Read more [...]

The Illustrious Way

Then Queen Srīmālā made three more great vows before the Buddha, saying.  "I will benefit an infinite number of sentient beings through the power of these vows: first, I will, by my good roots, attain the wisdom of the true Dharma in all my lifetimes; second, after I have attained the true wisdom, wherever I may be born I will explain it untiringly to all sentient beings; third, in whatever form I may be born, I will not spare life or limb in embracing, protecting, and upholding the true Read more [...]

Selections from the Mahāratnakūṭa Sūtra

The Mahāratnakūṭa Sūtra can be likened unto an ancient repository of forty-nine texts of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras. As such it is also known in its abbreviated title, the Ratnakūṭa Sūtra, or a heap containing some precious jewels of the Mahāyāna. There are indeed some great Dharma-Jewels contained within it. Our primary resource that houses excellent translations of these texts is A Treasury of Mahāyāna Sūtras: Selections from the Mahāratnakūṭa Sūtra, Translated from the Read more [...]

Praxis: Part II

(Hakeda) The Practice of Cessation Should there be a man who desires to practice “cessation,” he should stay in a quiet place and sit erect in an even temper. [His attention should be focused] neither on breathing nor on any form or color, nor on empty space, earth, water, fire, wind, nor even on what has been seen, heard, remembered, or conceived. All thoughts, as soon as they are conjured up, are to be discarded, and even the thought of discarding them is to be put away, for Read more [...]

Mind As Absolute Suchness

(Hakeda) The part on outline has been given; next the part on interpretation [of the principle of Mahayana] will be given. It consists of three chapters: (1) Revelation of the True Meaning; (2) Correction of Evil Attachments; (3) Analysis of the Types of Aspiration for Enlightenment. Chapter One Revelation of True Meaning  ONE MIND AND ITS TWO ASPECTS The revelation of the true meaning [of the principle of Mahāyāna can be achieved] by [unfolding the doctrine] that the Read more [...]

Awakening of Faith: Preliminaries

INVOCATION (Hakeda) I take refuge in [the Buddha,] the greatly Compassionate One, the Savior of the world, omnipotent, omnipresent, omniscient, of most excellent deeds in all the ten directions; And in [the Dharma,] the manifestation of his Essence, the Reality, the sea of Suchness, the boundless storehouse of excellencies; [And in the Sangha, whose members] truly devote themselves to the practice, May all sentient beings be made to discard their doubts, to cast aside their evil Read more [...]

The Mahāyāna-shraddhotpāda-shāstra

We next will be exploring perhaps the most significant document, alongside the Lankavatara Sutra, for adherents of Unborn Mind Zen as well as the best concise-systematic treatment of the Mahayana as a whole. This ‘Awakening of Faith in the Mahayana’ is attributed to the great early Buddhist philosopher and poet, Aśvaghosha: The fact that Aśvaghosha’s name was attached to the text, however, undoubtedly has had much to do with its popularity. He is known in Chinese as Maming or “Horse-neighing,” Read more [...]

Illumination

At that time the Bhagavat was respectfully surrounded by the fourfold assembly (i.e., monks, nuns, laymen, laywomen), paid homage, honored, and praised. He then taught the bodhisattvas the Mahayana sutra called Immeasurable Meanings (Mahānirdeśa), the instruction for the bodhisattvas and the treasured lore of the buddhas. After having taught this sutra, the Buddha sat cross-legged, entered the samādhi called the “abode of immeasurable meanings” (ananta-nirdeśa-pratiṣṭhāna) and remained Read more [...]
Categories